Bountiful Word

You Should Know How I Feel by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna: A Review

In Anu Lal, Books, Dhanya Krishna, You Should Know How I Feel... on February 2, 2015 at 2:25 pm

couple-beach-flower-romance-love copyYou Should Know How I Feel, is a collaborative collection of four short stories by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna that tackles the theme of love and it’s attendant trials and tribulations.

 
“My World Is Called You” by D. Krishna explores the concepts of miscommunication between couples and the erroneous conclusions that often result when suspicion and hastiness take hold over sober thought and dialogue. Through a chain of unfortunate events, the situation spirals out of control until both parties are made to realize the truth about their feelings for each other.

 
“Rukhsana’s Husband” by Anu Lal deals with the relationship of two people of different faiths; He is of Christian faith and she, of Muslim faith. Although their love is strong, the difficulty of revealing his faith to her parents weighs heavily on them until he resolves, at her urging, to convert to Islam in order to promote familial peace. Roles become reversed, however, as she wavers in her suggestion and his resolve to convert strengthens.

 
The last two tales, “I Am You”, by D. Krishna and “Like An Arabian Tale”, by Anu Lal, deal with the theme of family influence and tradition weighing on romantic liaisons. The first story deals with a woman’s apprehension of what may come to pass when a love relationship is revealed to her parents. The second tale delves into the fallout when one’s worst apprehensions, and more, are realized.

 
The unifying theme of these stories is one of existential crisis experienced when lovers are forced to grapple with the constraints of cultural expectations and with the weight of their families’ wishes and indeed, their own uncertainties of what is right. The characters are further challenged as they deal with their own self-images, desires, and the pull of modernity as they clash with the stereotypes of love marriages versus arranged unions. The struggles to live an authentic life, true to themselves is a universal theme as we all seek to live in accordance with our own values and dreams. I was somewhat surprised to realize the extent to which lovers must struggle to negotiate the treacherous shoals of romance against the backdrop of cultural and family pressure.

 
I enjoyed this book. The stories are well written and held my attention. Sprinkled throughout with humor, tension, mystery, and yes, romance, You Should Know How I Feel is worth a look.

A review by

Stephen Boka

This review is originally published in Amazon.com, Goodreads.com and Flipkart. Read the original here.

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