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Posts Tagged ‘Amazon Bestseller’

MOUNT SERMON: ON SALE NOW!

In Anu Lal, Mount Sermon on September 12, 2015 at 8:09 am

“Anu Lal, has done it again! A new Salman Rushdie in the making!”
___Siggy Buckley
Author, Next Time Lucky

 

Dear all,

The moment of childbirth, to see the graceful face of that new born, is one in a lifetime occasion. What I feel right now is not less than that. I am joyous to announce that my fifth book, Mount Sermon has been released in Amazon Kindle Store, as expected.

Here is the link for the book page: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B015923JX8

“In harmony with the fantasy-sating landscape of Cannanore and some of the characters from Wall of Colours and Other Stories – the first part of the trilogy, “Hope, Vengeance and History”, the author’s newly-cast storytellers and listeners of the written word entice their reading audience into an almost physical interaction from this book’s onset as well.”

__hülya n. yılmaz (Ph.D.) author, Trance (a tri-lingual book of poetry), senior lecturer, The Pennsylvania State University.

I hope you enjoy Mount Sermon and post your reviews Amazon and Goodreads.com.

Thank you for your continued support for my writing ventures.

God Bless you.

Anu Lal

Author, Mount Sermon.

PRAISES FOR MOUNT SERMON:

“Anu Lal’s stories have the breath of ancient storytellers, the wisdom of old days, and the immediacy of our contemporary age.”

___Irina Serban
Author, Hiding the Moon

“Author Anu Lal cleverly explores the psyche of his characters and analyzes the fine line between imagination and insanity while teaching us the strange relationships that exist between the characters and their environment,”
___Lena Winfrey Seder.
Author, The Metamorphosis of a Muslim – Autobiography of my Conversion

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Author Anu Lal on his new book Mount Sermon

In Anu Lal, Mount Sermon on September 11, 2015 at 10:30 am

I am really excited about my upcoming book Mount Sermon. This is my fifth book, that’s why. I would like to remember the blessings showered upon me by the Source of all being, my heavenly Father. I touch the feet of all my teachers. I send love to all my beloved friends and readers. Thank you for all your support. For those who have been with me since the days of Wall of Colours, a special thanks is due.

__Anu Lal

Mount Sermon: Revenge of an Indian Storyteller 

In Mount Sermon on September 10, 2015 at 7:16 am

Hi, I am an author. My name is Anu Lal. Some of you might have heard of me before, or read my books previously. For those who are coming across my writing for the first time, I would say that you can begin by reading Mount SermonMount Sermon is my fifth book. In Mount Sermon, I have attempted to perfect one of my well acclaimed strategies in fiction, which is, a story inside a story.

In Mount Sermon, I have attempted to tell the story of a storyteller. Within the story of this amazing man, you may also discover another story, the story of a gifted man. I would not want to reveal all the surprises here. But I can tell you, with Mount Sermon, I have taken my craft to a whole new level.

Mount Sermon is also the story of Lepak and his son Prekshaka. Lepak is a father who thinks he has all reasons to be rough with this son and everyone else around him who does not fall into his way of thinking. In his sudden rage, Lepak messes up with the wrong man. He beats up the storyteller.

Humiliated and shattered because Lepak ruined one of his most productive days, the storyteller designs a brutal tale. He has a bait to lure Lepak in. The bait the storyteller uses is none other than Lepak’s little boy.

Located in the exotic mountains of Cannanore, and fantastic landscape of Salode, this story would take your sensibility to another dimension.

Mount Sermon is a novella, an extremely apt fit for your Kindle reader. A novella is not as long as a novel and not too short as a short story. Therefore, for your busy schedule and entertainment, Mount Sermon would be the best choice this weekend. Mount Sermon would be on sale in Kindle stores across the world, from 11 September 2015 onward.

Happy reading, and have a happy and safe weekend with the enigmatic storyteller, Lepak and his son, Prekshaka.

About the Author: 

Anu Lal is a bestselling author, book reviewer and blogger. His recent book, You Should Know How I Feel… has been a bestseller Contemporary Romance in Amazon ebooks, and paperback.

He is the first Indian author to write a trilogy in short story collections in English: ‘Hope, Vengeance and History’ trilogy. The first book in this trilogy is Wall of Colours and Other Stories, which is published in July 2013.

His blog, ‘The Indian Commentator’ is one of India’s leading book blogs. Also a very successful educator, he works as a Lecturer in English at a major institution in Kannur, Kerala. He loves music, art, books, and above all, the incessant desire to write.

Contact Anu Lal at: anulal05@gmail.com
Blog: http://anu-lal.blogspot.com/

You Should Know How I Feel by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna: A Review

In Anu Lal, Books, Dhanya Krishna, You Should Know How I Feel... on February 2, 2015 at 2:25 pm

couple-beach-flower-romance-love copyYou Should Know How I Feel, is a collaborative collection of four short stories by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna that tackles the theme of love and it’s attendant trials and tribulations.

 
“My World Is Called You” by D. Krishna explores the concepts of miscommunication between couples and the erroneous conclusions that often result when suspicion and hastiness take hold over sober thought and dialogue. Through a chain of unfortunate events, the situation spirals out of control until both parties are made to realize the truth about their feelings for each other.

 
“Rukhsana’s Husband” by Anu Lal deals with the relationship of two people of different faiths; He is of Christian faith and she, of Muslim faith. Although their love is strong, the difficulty of revealing his faith to her parents weighs heavily on them until he resolves, at her urging, to convert to Islam in order to promote familial peace. Roles become reversed, however, as she wavers in her suggestion and his resolve to convert strengthens.

 
The last two tales, “I Am You”, by D. Krishna and “Like An Arabian Tale”, by Anu Lal, deal with the theme of family influence and tradition weighing on romantic liaisons. The first story deals with a woman’s apprehension of what may come to pass when a love relationship is revealed to her parents. The second tale delves into the fallout when one’s worst apprehensions, and more, are realized.

 
The unifying theme of these stories is one of existential crisis experienced when lovers are forced to grapple with the constraints of cultural expectations and with the weight of their families’ wishes and indeed, their own uncertainties of what is right. The characters are further challenged as they deal with their own self-images, desires, and the pull of modernity as they clash with the stereotypes of love marriages versus arranged unions. The struggles to live an authentic life, true to themselves is a universal theme as we all seek to live in accordance with our own values and dreams. I was somewhat surprised to realize the extent to which lovers must struggle to negotiate the treacherous shoals of romance against the backdrop of cultural and family pressure.

 
I enjoyed this book. The stories are well written and held my attention. Sprinkled throughout with humor, tension, mystery, and yes, romance, You Should Know How I Feel is worth a look.

A review by

Stephen Boka

This review is originally published in Amazon.com, Goodreads.com and Flipkart. Read the original here.

BUY You Should Know How I Feel…

Amazon.com

Flipkart

Goodreads

You Should Know His Journey: Anu Lal Reveals

In Anu Lal, You Should Know How I Feel... on June 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm

Gamble everything for love,

if you’re a true human being

–Rumi3D-Love-Heart

Writing, for me, is an act of love. When I say this, I cringe at the weight of similarities in how many of my fellow writers have approached their courses of writing. Many of us are in love. Some of us fell in it, as an act of total accident, while some others chose to learn it, acquire it, and master its nuances, the wise ones.

Two weeks from Valentine’s Day, I still consider the possibility of dedicating a whole day for love. Questions such as- Why is just one day for love? Shouldn’t we dedicate all our days to love?- always arise talking with students. But the fortunate thing about asking such a question in the classroom is that they always have answers. And some of them daringly share their ideas. Some of my students suggest that when life is busier and no one has time to spend with their beloved one, and when work means survival, we need at least a day to convey what we feel for the other person, at least through a small gesture.

 It’s sort of a Victorian modesty, to say the least, the avenues of love and the ways we communicate it these days. We love the form and texture of our message, like a Victorian, who would love the same about long letters written in Victorian English. A card, a text message, an e-mail, or an e-card could define our feelings, these days. It is easy, if you look at it that way. Through a pre-programmed e-card your teeming desires and passions are poured out. This, for a Victorian poet, might have taken hundreds of pages of inspired poetry. What about the ordinary folks in the Victorian England, those who could not compose lengthy poetry or weave a genuine piece of prose on their deepest romantic urges?

The love we find in Thomas Hardy’s fiction, for example Under the Greenwood Tree, in which Dick Dewy, a young member of the Mellstock Choir, who is wading in his love with Fancy Day, the beautiful teacher at the parish school, closely portrays insecurities in love. Dick Dewy spends a considerable time in finding out whether Fancy Day is actually in love with him. His convictions often misguide him or so he feels. His passion is visible, but the response he gathers from his sweet heart is not straightforward. This raises tension in the novel. One may feel at the end that it is a sweet story of less sophisticated people, country folks, so to speak.

Had there been an e-card or text message facility, the two characters—Dick and Fancy—might have sorted their initial problems out quite smoothly. Or could they?

It is true that a passion poorly communicated is a smoking gun. But if love is all too easy to communicate, so many of our gifted writers would not have left it mostly unsaid in their writings. The beauty of Knut Hamsun’s novel Victoria is in the agony endured by the tender young hearts due to their unspoken feelings.

I am in Love with Love

and Love is in love with me.

My body is in Love with the soul

and the soul is in Love with my body.

I opened my arms to Love

and Love embraced me like a lover.

–Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī

The great poet of the Sufi tradition is clear about the course of love. In being so clear, he is unclear too. The suggestive power of these lines is what mystifies us, prompts us to investigate into the section of our mind where poetry is translated into feelings.

krWords converged into feelings are capable of transcending the human realm and reaching the mystical. What transpires between the writer and the pages become a part of the reader’s reality too. Writing a second book was the result of this realization.

My first book Wall of Colours and Other Stories is the first in a trilogy titled Hope, vengeance and History. Although I currently work on the series, a few new stories showed themselves and I decided to write them down. I wrote one down, first. Then I showed this to Ms. Dhanya Krishna, my editor for Wall of Colours. I received an exciting suggestion that I must upload this story in Amazon Kindle, for my readers. We both considered this option for a while. Then I told her that I have a second story. This is when she suggested we should go print with the two stories, if they are long enough. I knew her skills not just as an editor, but as a writer too. It did not take me long to ask her why doesn’t she contribute a few stories herself, so that we could co-author this new book.

With some reluctance in the beginning, she accepted my suggestion and we started working on You Should Know How I Feel. Our initial plan was to release it on Valentine’s Day, because the stories in this book celebrate love. Both of us contributed two long stories each and the process of putting the book together took some more time than expected.

Mr. Saneesh Raj, a friend and classmate of mine designed a beautiful cover for You Should Know How I Feel. A preview to the book cover will be released tomorrow, here at TIC. So set a reminder, please, and make this occasion a memorable one with your presence, as always.

ON SALE NOW!

ON SALE NOW!

You Should Know How I Feel is about love and the many places one can find it. In the journey of writing this book, I learnt that the season of love is undying. In other words, love gives us a glimpse of eternity. Tomorrow will be another day for me, you and all your beloved ones to cherish and celebrate love, much like Valentine’s Day. Each day, whenever you open the pages of You Should Know How I Feel, love will resurrect from the ashes of mundane routines and will assert its supremacy over our lives.

May in your life, love be abundant.

I will leave you with a quote by Ray Bradbury on love: “Love is the answer to everything. It’s the only reason to do anything. If you don’t write stories you love, you’ll never make it. If you don’t write stories that other people love, you’ll never make it.”

With love,

Anu Lal