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Posts Tagged ‘book review’

MOUNT SERMON: ON SALE NOW!

In Anu Lal, Mount Sermon on September 12, 2015 at 8:09 am

“Anu Lal, has done it again! A new Salman Rushdie in the making!”
___Siggy Buckley
Author, Next Time Lucky

 

Dear all,

The moment of childbirth, to see the graceful face of that new born, is one in a lifetime occasion. What I feel right now is not less than that. I am joyous to announce that my fifth book, Mount Sermon has been released in Amazon Kindle Store, as expected.

Here is the link for the book page: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B015923JX8

“In harmony with the fantasy-sating landscape of Cannanore and some of the characters from Wall of Colours and Other Stories – the first part of the trilogy, “Hope, Vengeance and History”, the author’s newly-cast storytellers and listeners of the written word entice their reading audience into an almost physical interaction from this book’s onset as well.”

__hülya n. yılmaz (Ph.D.) author, Trance (a tri-lingual book of poetry), senior lecturer, The Pennsylvania State University.

I hope you enjoy Mount Sermon and post your reviews Amazon and Goodreads.com.

Thank you for your continued support for my writing ventures.

God Bless you.

Anu Lal

Author, Mount Sermon.

PRAISES FOR MOUNT SERMON:

“Anu Lal’s stories have the breath of ancient storytellers, the wisdom of old days, and the immediacy of our contemporary age.”

___Irina Serban
Author, Hiding the Moon

“Author Anu Lal cleverly explores the psyche of his characters and analyzes the fine line between imagination and insanity while teaching us the strange relationships that exist between the characters and their environment,”
___Lena Winfrey Seder.
Author, The Metamorphosis of a Muslim – Autobiography of my Conversion

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Mount Sermon: Revenge of an Indian Storyteller 

In Mount Sermon on September 10, 2015 at 7:16 am

Hi, I am an author. My name is Anu Lal. Some of you might have heard of me before, or read my books previously. For those who are coming across my writing for the first time, I would say that you can begin by reading Mount SermonMount Sermon is my fifth book. In Mount Sermon, I have attempted to perfect one of my well acclaimed strategies in fiction, which is, a story inside a story.

In Mount Sermon, I have attempted to tell the story of a storyteller. Within the story of this amazing man, you may also discover another story, the story of a gifted man. I would not want to reveal all the surprises here. But I can tell you, with Mount Sermon, I have taken my craft to a whole new level.

Mount Sermon is also the story of Lepak and his son Prekshaka. Lepak is a father who thinks he has all reasons to be rough with this son and everyone else around him who does not fall into his way of thinking. In his sudden rage, Lepak messes up with the wrong man. He beats up the storyteller.

Humiliated and shattered because Lepak ruined one of his most productive days, the storyteller designs a brutal tale. He has a bait to lure Lepak in. The bait the storyteller uses is none other than Lepak’s little boy.

Located in the exotic mountains of Cannanore, and fantastic landscape of Salode, this story would take your sensibility to another dimension.

Mount Sermon is a novella, an extremely apt fit for your Kindle reader. A novella is not as long as a novel and not too short as a short story. Therefore, for your busy schedule and entertainment, Mount Sermon would be the best choice this weekend. Mount Sermon would be on sale in Kindle stores across the world, from 11 September 2015 onward.

Happy reading, and have a happy and safe weekend with the enigmatic storyteller, Lepak and his son, Prekshaka.

About the Author: 

Anu Lal is a bestselling author, book reviewer and blogger. His recent book, You Should Know How I Feel… has been a bestseller Contemporary Romance in Amazon ebooks, and paperback.

He is the first Indian author to write a trilogy in short story collections in English: ‘Hope, Vengeance and History’ trilogy. The first book in this trilogy is Wall of Colours and Other Stories, which is published in July 2013.

His blog, ‘The Indian Commentator’ is one of India’s leading book blogs. Also a very successful educator, he works as a Lecturer in English at a major institution in Kannur, Kerala. He loves music, art, books, and above all, the incessant desire to write.

Contact Anu Lal at: anulal05@gmail.com
Blog: http://anu-lal.blogspot.com/

Mount Sermon: A Novella

In Uncategorized on September 10, 2015 at 7:08 am

Dear Readers,

Here are some awesome wallpapers from the Bountiful Word Publishing team. These wall papers feature the moods and words from the new book by the Amazon bestselling author Anu Lal.

Fascinating insights and in-depth understanding of human psyche is one of the special features of author Anu Lal’s craftsmanship.

You Should Know How I Feel by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna: A Review

In Anu Lal, Books, Dhanya Krishna, You Should Know How I Feel... on February 2, 2015 at 2:25 pm

couple-beach-flower-romance-love copyYou Should Know How I Feel, is a collaborative collection of four short stories by Anu Lal and Dhanya Krishna that tackles the theme of love and it’s attendant trials and tribulations.

 
“My World Is Called You” by D. Krishna explores the concepts of miscommunication between couples and the erroneous conclusions that often result when suspicion and hastiness take hold over sober thought and dialogue. Through a chain of unfortunate events, the situation spirals out of control until both parties are made to realize the truth about their feelings for each other.

 
“Rukhsana’s Husband” by Anu Lal deals with the relationship of two people of different faiths; He is of Christian faith and she, of Muslim faith. Although their love is strong, the difficulty of revealing his faith to her parents weighs heavily on them until he resolves, at her urging, to convert to Islam in order to promote familial peace. Roles become reversed, however, as she wavers in her suggestion and his resolve to convert strengthens.

 
The last two tales, “I Am You”, by D. Krishna and “Like An Arabian Tale”, by Anu Lal, deal with the theme of family influence and tradition weighing on romantic liaisons. The first story deals with a woman’s apprehension of what may come to pass when a love relationship is revealed to her parents. The second tale delves into the fallout when one’s worst apprehensions, and more, are realized.

 
The unifying theme of these stories is one of existential crisis experienced when lovers are forced to grapple with the constraints of cultural expectations and with the weight of their families’ wishes and indeed, their own uncertainties of what is right. The characters are further challenged as they deal with their own self-images, desires, and the pull of modernity as they clash with the stereotypes of love marriages versus arranged unions. The struggles to live an authentic life, true to themselves is a universal theme as we all seek to live in accordance with our own values and dreams. I was somewhat surprised to realize the extent to which lovers must struggle to negotiate the treacherous shoals of romance against the backdrop of cultural and family pressure.

 
I enjoyed this book. The stories are well written and held my attention. Sprinkled throughout with humor, tension, mystery, and yes, romance, You Should Know How I Feel is worth a look.

A review by

Stephen Boka

This review is originally published in Amazon.com, Goodreads.com and Flipkart. Read the original here.

BUY You Should Know How I Feel…

Amazon.com

Flipkart

Goodreads

What Type Are You?

In Writing Solutions on October 27, 2013 at 2:03 pm
Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

The first part of the book is titled ‘The Extrovert Ideal’. As I plodded through Part One, I felt more drawn towards the tactics and means employed in order to equip people to be better public speakers and team leaders.

The idea that if you can talk unhesitant and on a short notice, your presence would claim a considerable authority. People like fast talkers and enthusiastic go-getters. The down side, of course, is that those who feel uncomfortable about talking aloud in classrooms or in public gathering would be marginalized.

Susan Cain’s bestselling nonfiction, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking hooked me with its subheading.The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” is the central discourse of the book. That explains why I found Quiet interesting.

Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

Ever since, I started attending school, no one ever found me in the school sports or arts festivals. Once, when I was forced to participate in an oratory, I stopped the speech in the middle and realized if I stayed on the stage a moment more, I would faint. Those were great lessons of human psyche to me, first hand of course, that people faint when faced with extreme stress.

In sports, thankfully, I never qualified the initial qualifying levels. Although I was athletic enough, a certain lack of inertia held my limbs tighter than how the tar holds the roads in Kerala.

I knew what my problem was. Someone had informed me. Perhaps, one of my parents, that I am an introvert. It sounded like ‘caveman’, for the ten year old that I was. Someone told me, when I was reluctant to go out to play with other kids that I should not behave like an introvert. That is bad, they said. ‘Bad’ meant dirty, unacceptable, secretive, and this might lead me to delinquency, they warned me.

I had thought that introversion was something like a habit, then. I did not know where I picked it up, though. Anyway, the next best thing was to ‘improve’ my personality. That’s when an individual begins the incessant struggles to fit in. Everyone who lives in such a social set up must have realized where I am driving at.

From her introduction onwards, Susan Cain drives towards the same direction. In Part One, however, what fascinated me was how a culture has found out the measures for an individual to stand out and lead. This was what I was talking about in the first paragraph.

Yes, indeed, this is the quest for purification of personality, in order to attain some sort of outgoing persona. This desire governed much of my childhood. I also suspect that my increased curiosity about how to be an influential person with spoken word has to do with the profession I handle as my day job—teaching.

I meet students who are on the extrovert side, mostly, and others who are introverts. I also find ambiverts in class, a term I learnt from Susan Cain’s book. Part One of Quiet follows the history of how American culture changed from the “Culture of Character” to the “Culture of Personality”.

Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

It is impossible for me to go back to that memory and think about myself standing in front of those many people at my school, in that public speaking competition. Although I had memorized all my speech thoroughly, the pressure was so much that I could not keep track of it at all. My dad had written that speech. I felt I let him down. I really did.

I still remember, in another speech, which was conducted exclusively in classroom, asking my family if I could pitch an idea all by myself, right on the spot, as if it is a reply or supplementation of the previous speaker’s words. Countering, arguing, and being spontaneous to the moment seemed fun. Remember, the same scared owl dropped the platter in the middle of the speech, the previous time. However, my family told me not to attempt this bravado at this point. Later in my life, I realized that I was a better public speaker, if I were spontaneous. Being an introvert, I had figured out to tackle the issue of forgetting the words I memorized and building confidence in front of the public, though I never really got a real chance as a kid to practice this.

Quiet will let you know about yourself or at least what type of person you live with, in a skillfully nonjudgmental way.

Review Courtesy: TIC