Bountiful Word

Posts Tagged ‘creativity’

Better than All Happy Ever Afters

In Anu Lal, Books on January 24, 2016 at 11:47 am

Better than All Happy Ever Afters

This season is emotional. I heard a young man commit suicide at a university. They say he was murdered by the authorities. Some say murder was a figure of speech. I think both are right. I have only one solution-Love. To love the victim and the victimiser. How can I love the victimiser? I think I can. We all love ourselves, don’t we? Have we not victimised another individual, at least once in a lifetime?

A few of my friends and I were in a very important work these days. We have come out with a wonderful message. This message is that of love. Today, we would like to inaugurate the Facebook page for this great message:

BETTER THAN ALL HAPPY EVER AFTERS

Please do like our page: Here

For more information, visit: http://bwbooksonline.weebly.com/

Stay in Love,

Anu Lal

Bestselling author of You Should Know How I Feel

http://anu-lal.blogspot.in/

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Author Anu Lal on his new book Mount Sermon

In Anu Lal, Mount Sermon on September 11, 2015 at 10:30 am

I am really excited about my upcoming book Mount Sermon. This is my fifth book, that’s why. I would like to remember the blessings showered upon me by the Source of all being, my heavenly Father. I touch the feet of all my teachers. I send love to all my beloved friends and readers. Thank you for all your support. For those who have been with me since the days of Wall of Colours, a special thanks is due.

__Anu Lal

How to Handle the Fear to Write

In Writing Solutions on September 4, 2013 at 10:04 am
Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

Oh my God! I desperately wanted to finish that story. Look! I have abandoned it. I had been working on it for the past one month. It’s been six weeks since I haven’t touched it. Would I be able to resume it? How could I do justice to the story, now, after such a long time of discontinuation? I do have some notes made from the times, while I worked on the stuff. I do not think those notes are of any help, anymore, though.

It is clear to me how vague the classification of writers would be if I categorized them based on such feelings as above. A writer, at almost all stages of his or her growth feels this way. Most of those super-successful writers may not experience it the same way, because they have the ability to pursue writing without bothering much about another day-job, but apparently have other issues that affect them the same way.

If writing gives a person immense pleasure or joy, and the person is forced to work in a bakery in order to make a living, the resulting conflict could damage the mental equilibrium of that person. Those person(s) who have no aptitude for working in a bakery, when forced to compromise their psychological ecosystem with the sophistication of an altogether different system of things, creative writing suffers. This is when one feels; “Oh my God! I desperately wanted to finish that story. Look! I have abandoned it.”

The fear for being not able to do justice to one’s work of a lifetime deserves wise handling. If not, it will consume the writer, wholly. The totality of all fears has their common grounding in the unknown. In the case of the above-mentioned writer, (let us call him Paul) the unknown part is the quality of his work. Paul does not know and fears this fact: how would it all turn out to be. How could I do justice to the story, now, after such a long time of discontinuation?

In order to undo the fear of the unknown, the simplest method can be the Jungian concept of assimilation of psychic realities. Carl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) was a German psychoanalyst, whose groundbreaking theories on human mind, guided the world into a modern-renaissance. He argues about a specific course of action through which a human being can bring out the contents of his unconscious and experience it in the conscious level in order to alleviate the pressure from the unconscious side.

This same method is useful in undoing the fear for the unknown in Paul’s case. If Paul is uncertain of the results his work could bring him after a considerable gap in the process of writing, he should first, look at the results. There is only one way he can get the result—by completing the work. Paul just needs some gut feeling to cross the initial fear.

If one is stuck with the fear of how the work would turn out to be, the possibility of writing a book or a story is obliterated entirely. It is up to you to take that step courageously. Your work deserves to be born, simply because you have such strong feeling for it. Let your fears not obligate the stopping of your creative work.