Bountiful Word

Posts Tagged ‘living’

Better than All Happy Ever Afters

In Anu Lal, Books on January 24, 2016 at 11:47 am

Better than All Happy Ever Afters

This season is emotional. I heard a young man commit suicide at a university. They say he was murdered by the authorities. Some say murder was a figure of speech. I think both are right. I have only one solution-Love. To love the victim and the victimiser. How can I love the victimiser? I think I can. We all love ourselves, don’t we? Have we not victimised another individual, at least once in a lifetime?

A few of my friends and I were in a very important work these days. We have come out with a wonderful message. This message is that of love. Today, we would like to inaugurate the Facebook page for this great message:

BETTER THAN ALL HAPPY EVER AFTERS

Please do like our page: Here

For more information, visit: http://bwbooksonline.weebly.com/

Stay in Love,

Anu Lal

Bestselling author of You Should Know How I Feel

http://anu-lal.blogspot.in/

In Anu Lal, Books, Dhanya Krishna, Wall of Colours, You Should Know How I Feel... on March 23, 2014 at 7:23 am

Dear Bountiful Friends,

You are a special group of celestial beings, destined to come across and share love among each other. Bountiful Word Publishing realizes this fact. Therefore, we started a new endeavor in this direction. This endeavor we call YOU SHOULD KNOW HOW I FEEL…, a bunch of love stories by our author Anu Lal.

With extremely high quality of performance, we have created, yet again, a book that can stand the test of time and generations to be a true classic. The stories in You Should Know How I Feel… will no doubt be your favorite ones forever.

Anu Lal, the first Indian author to write a trilogy in short story collects is all set to conquer the world with his fresh and lyrical story telling style. His language conquers and charms the readers’ minds. Through You Should Know How I Feel… he is introducing Dhanya Krishna, a very talented writer, as his co-author.

The book contains a bonus story for all the loyal readers of Bountiful Word. A surprise awaits you at the end of the book, after the bonus story!

ON SALE NOW!

ON SALE NOW!

We wish you all, a very happy reading. It’s time to rekindle your passion and love, one more time.

The Kindle version of You Should Know How I Feel… is on sale through all amazon stores across the world.

Kindly let us know how you feel after reading the humble effort of ours. Tap here for a copy of You Should Know How I Feel…  Tap

Please visit the Facebook page for more activities.

NEXT: Read an exciting article by author ANU LAL on the writing journey, in our next issue!

What Type Are You?

In Writing Solutions on October 27, 2013 at 2:03 pm
Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

The first part of the book is titled ‘The Extrovert Ideal’. As I plodded through Part One, I felt more drawn towards the tactics and means employed in order to equip people to be better public speakers and team leaders.

The idea that if you can talk unhesitant and on a short notice, your presence would claim a considerable authority. People like fast talkers and enthusiastic go-getters. The down side, of course, is that those who feel uncomfortable about talking aloud in classrooms or in public gathering would be marginalized.

Susan Cain’s bestselling nonfiction, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking hooked me with its subheading.The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” is the central discourse of the book. That explains why I found Quiet interesting.

Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

Ever since, I started attending school, no one ever found me in the school sports or arts festivals. Once, when I was forced to participate in an oratory, I stopped the speech in the middle and realized if I stayed on the stage a moment more, I would faint. Those were great lessons of human psyche to me, first hand of course, that people faint when faced with extreme stress.

In sports, thankfully, I never qualified the initial qualifying levels. Although I was athletic enough, a certain lack of inertia held my limbs tighter than how the tar holds the roads in Kerala.

I knew what my problem was. Someone had informed me. Perhaps, one of my parents, that I am an introvert. It sounded like ‘caveman’, for the ten year old that I was. Someone told me, when I was reluctant to go out to play with other kids that I should not behave like an introvert. That is bad, they said. ‘Bad’ meant dirty, unacceptable, secretive, and this might lead me to delinquency, they warned me.

I had thought that introversion was something like a habit, then. I did not know where I picked it up, though. Anyway, the next best thing was to ‘improve’ my personality. That’s when an individual begins the incessant struggles to fit in. Everyone who lives in such a social set up must have realized where I am driving at.

From her introduction onwards, Susan Cain drives towards the same direction. In Part One, however, what fascinated me was how a culture has found out the measures for an individual to stand out and lead. This was what I was talking about in the first paragraph.

Yes, indeed, this is the quest for purification of personality, in order to attain some sort of outgoing persona. This desire governed much of my childhood. I also suspect that my increased curiosity about how to be an influential person with spoken word has to do with the profession I handle as my day job—teaching.

I meet students who are on the extrovert side, mostly, and others who are introverts. I also find ambiverts in class, a term I learnt from Susan Cain’s book. Part One of Quiet follows the history of how American culture changed from the “Culture of Character” to the “Culture of Personality”.

Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

It is impossible for me to go back to that memory and think about myself standing in front of those many people at my school, in that public speaking competition. Although I had memorized all my speech thoroughly, the pressure was so much that I could not keep track of it at all. My dad had written that speech. I felt I let him down. I really did.

I still remember, in another speech, which was conducted exclusively in classroom, asking my family if I could pitch an idea all by myself, right on the spot, as if it is a reply or supplementation of the previous speaker’s words. Countering, arguing, and being spontaneous to the moment seemed fun. Remember, the same scared owl dropped the platter in the middle of the speech, the previous time. However, my family told me not to attempt this bravado at this point. Later in my life, I realized that I was a better public speaker, if I were spontaneous. Being an introvert, I had figured out to tackle the issue of forgetting the words I memorized and building confidence in front of the public, though I never really got a real chance as a kid to practice this.

Quiet will let you know about yourself or at least what type of person you live with, in a skillfully nonjudgmental way.

Review Courtesy: TIC

How to Handle the Fear to Write

In Writing Solutions on September 4, 2013 at 10:04 am
Courtesy: Google Images

Courtesy: Google Images

Oh my God! I desperately wanted to finish that story. Look! I have abandoned it. I had been working on it for the past one month. It’s been six weeks since I haven’t touched it. Would I be able to resume it? How could I do justice to the story, now, after such a long time of discontinuation? I do have some notes made from the times, while I worked on the stuff. I do not think those notes are of any help, anymore, though.

It is clear to me how vague the classification of writers would be if I categorized them based on such feelings as above. A writer, at almost all stages of his or her growth feels this way. Most of those super-successful writers may not experience it the same way, because they have the ability to pursue writing without bothering much about another day-job, but apparently have other issues that affect them the same way.

If writing gives a person immense pleasure or joy, and the person is forced to work in a bakery in order to make a living, the resulting conflict could damage the mental equilibrium of that person. Those person(s) who have no aptitude for working in a bakery, when forced to compromise their psychological ecosystem with the sophistication of an altogether different system of things, creative writing suffers. This is when one feels; “Oh my God! I desperately wanted to finish that story. Look! I have abandoned it.”

The fear for being not able to do justice to one’s work of a lifetime deserves wise handling. If not, it will consume the writer, wholly. The totality of all fears has their common grounding in the unknown. In the case of the above-mentioned writer, (let us call him Paul) the unknown part is the quality of his work. Paul does not know and fears this fact: how would it all turn out to be. How could I do justice to the story, now, after such a long time of discontinuation?

In order to undo the fear of the unknown, the simplest method can be the Jungian concept of assimilation of psychic realities. Carl Gustav Jung (1875–1961) was a German psychoanalyst, whose groundbreaking theories on human mind, guided the world into a modern-renaissance. He argues about a specific course of action through which a human being can bring out the contents of his unconscious and experience it in the conscious level in order to alleviate the pressure from the unconscious side.

This same method is useful in undoing the fear for the unknown in Paul’s case. If Paul is uncertain of the results his work could bring him after a considerable gap in the process of writing, he should first, look at the results. There is only one way he can get the result—by completing the work. Paul just needs some gut feeling to cross the initial fear.

If one is stuck with the fear of how the work would turn out to be, the possibility of writing a book or a story is obliterated entirely. It is up to you to take that step courageously. Your work deserves to be born, simply because you have such strong feeling for it. Let your fears not obligate the stopping of your creative work.

Say Open Sesame!

In Working Freelance on October 7, 2012 at 1:50 pm

Courtesy: Google Images

Whatever the work of words you completed, with relentless labour of words and fuming brainwork, the first draft always sucks. Your work might at sometimes fails to meet the height of expectations you kept for yourself.  It is a universal truth and little less true in any writer’s case —experienced or not.

Practice appreciation, once you finished your write up, short story, poem, lyric, novel, non-fiction, creative non-fiction or literary fan-fiction or parody.

Only if you are ready to accept yourself, someone else will accept you. Self-admiration is the key to mould your artist’s personality and to glue it up tight.

Look back and appreciate what you did in your first draft. The major issue most of the beginners come up with is the diffidence that infests them when they go back and read the article or story they have just finished. Reason—what if the first draft read vulgar?

The inspiration to write a piece would have given you a certain pleasure, feeling good about what you did with those words in the word processor is an act of extending that pleasure.

You must read the above paragraph one more time if the word ‘feeling’ did not sit well with your understanding. It could just be the wellness that you might feel after banging out those 2000 plus words a day, or less, often. The ‘feel’ could just be the contentment in what you did. This feeling drives away the darkness of hard times and restrictions in the writer’s life, in his journey of becoming.

Courtesy: Google Images

You are in a journey to see the day, when your words go around the world and bring you daily bread. This journey requires the fuel of self appreciation. It should not of course verge extreme self-centeredness. That will be less short of blindness. On the other hand, taking the balanced act of appreciating one’s own work helps a writer work her way through hard times.

Self appreciation can make a considerable difference in a writer’s life. This is the door towards a successful writing career that we all often forget to keep open. Say it: “Open sesame!”